Archive for the ‘Tech’ Category

This speaker is really good and better than what I thought it might be (though I have Mpow BT Headphones, and they’re my absolute favourite, so I already had high hopes!).

The sound is clear, volume good — Bass is clear and solid but the EQ is more “Balanced” than “bass heavy”, Vocals were nicely clear and sharp (listening to Goth Rock & Rock-styled “pop” music that rely on good bass & powerful vocals, and it didn’t let the songs down — perfectly good for a shower situation!).

I really enjoyed listening to it, and it was clear to hear in the shower under the spray.

It’s easy to hold (coming from someone who finds holding things difficult) and the back has a soft rubber that makes it non-slippery for the Shower. The buttons on the back are easy to press too, and have solid clicks that let you know you’ve pressed them correctly. 

 It was perfectly fine with the water spray on it. The suction cup that came with it, held its own OK, but when it was under the water spray quite constantly, it did end up falling. And the speaker was none the worse for it, either. I ended up hanging it by the rope under the shower head after that, and the rope is robust and thick and sturdy.

Bluetooth is easy to pair (Looking for “Soundhot Q2” & selecting it, paired with my phone without issue). The in-built TF option (as in Micro SD card, like in your phone) is also a good one, making it even easier to listen to music. 

You can also take hands-free phone calls on this. When I tried this, the tone was clear on both sides, the connection good and stable. It’s answered by an easy click on the Play/Pause/Call button on the back. Just as simple as that.

It seems quite easy to ensure you don’t miss a call whilst you’re in the shower with this. It’s a great idea, because you also can’t miss a call because “you didn’t hear it with the radio on” whilst you were in there, too.


I’m definitely happy with this. It’s proved itself well as a showering companion, and I’ll think nothing of using it as a general BT speaker, either. Mpow in general are definitely a favourite with me in general (and I’ve been through oh-so-many different companies in these things, headphones, speakers, etc!). This didn’t let me down either. Phew!



 

Using Split Screen Safari in iOS 10

… Including how to get back out of it! 

 

Go To 

How To Geek

 

 

And how to get out of it…!

…to go back to a single Safari window is to tap and hold on the tabs button in either Safari window. Select “Merge All Tabs” from the popup menu.

Scrapbook Section

 

TEC.BEAN

7 Colors Backlit Gaming Keyboard

Instruction Book

User Manual

 

   FYI: For me

Backlit  User Settings:

 

 

~      ~      ~ 

 

NOTES TO SELF:

Mass Effect: Andromeda is fun, exploitative, interesting, and has an immense amount of subtle Easter Eggs nodding to the original ME Trilogy. It even gives you a Space Hamster again – albeit and Andromeda one this time.

What it is not, though, is stable. The NVIDIA graphics have been all over the place, drivers changing constantly for all the gazzilions of games NVIDIA has to give specific support to. It doesn’t seem to restricted to just PC editions either… but I suppose at least  with a PC you have a little more ammunition to work around it than you do with a console.

Because they’re so constantly changing, the rendering has to be modified and tweaked along with, as does my ASUS Stryx overclocking software. Balancing is impossible, because it seems to change with every NVIDIA driver update.

To keep track, I’m just going to leave my notes here, so I can find them again… Hopefully.

 

  ~ Tested with GeForce v. 382.05

 

 

KEY POINTS OF SPECS 1:
  • Medium Lighting
  • Ultra Shadows
  • Medium Post Process
  • High Depthh-of-Field
  • High Shader (Maxed)
  • Ultra Textures
  • Temporal AA
  • HBAO Full
  • Ultra Effects
  • Ultra Terrain

=> Very good colour & graphics; Minor Slowdown in cutscene

 

 

KEY POINTS OF SPECS 2:
  • Low Lighting
  • Ultra Shadows
  • Ultra Post Process
  • High Depth-of-Field
  • High Shader (Maxed)
  • Ultra Textures
  • Temporal AA
  • HBAO Full

=> Good colour & graphics; Some slowdown

 

Mass Effect Andromeda 05.05.2017 - 23.20.24.06

~ Grahics Rendering Specs 2 ~  

 

KEY POINTS OF SPECS 3:
  • Medium Lighting
  • Ultra Shadows
  • Ultra Post Process
  • High Depth-of-Field
  • High Shader (Maxed)
  • Ultra Textures
  • Temporal AA
  • HBAO Full

=> Very good colour & graphics; Slowdown in cutscenes

 

 

KEY POINTS OF SPECS 4:
  • High Lighting
  • Ultra Shadows
  • Medium Post Process
  • High Depth-of-Field
  • High Shader (Maxed)
  • Ultra Textures
  • Temporal AA
  • HBAO Full

=> Good colour & graphics; Slowdown

KEY POINTS OF SPECS 5:
  • Low Lighting
  • Ultra Shadows
  • High Post Process
  • High Depth-of-Field
  • High Shader (Maxed)
  • Ultra Textures
  • Temporal AA
  • HBAO Full

=> Great colour & graphics; Acceptable Cutscenes

 

 

~ 4K Gaming ~

PC SPECS:

~ PC ~ i7-4790K ~ 16GB RAM ~ GTX 1060 6GB OC ~ High/Ultra Specs ~ 4K graphics resolution~ Recorded at 3840 x 2160 ~ 4K Playback ~

 And these are the other Rendering Spec Options:

~ Other Options Tested ~

My New Build

And finally I have it – my self-build computer all in one piece. I have now built my lovely, new handmade PC from all my components and parts. My own build. My very own baby. With everything chosen by me and put together with the help of a very capably friend (one brought in who knew what they were doing).

I harvested the optical drive (CD/DVD drive) and the HDD (Hard Disk Drive) from my old computer – there’s no point getting rid of good components. The rest I saved for and bought myself, or received as a gift. After about a year of planning, it’s now finally here.

There’s just one hitch… the HDD (a normal hard drive – the ones with the spinning disc plates – that is somewhat old… OK, pretty old… and is just basic cheap and standard-stock) that I put in was harvested from a (now-broken) pre-built computer. I had many problems with booting (or not booting, as the case may be) when trying to run my old machine… and it turns out that the Windows 7 OS on it is doesn’t work.

It tries to start, gives the option for System Repair or start as Normal. The Normal option just sends you strait back to that same message. System Repair then goes through the motions, tries to repair from Restore Point, fails at that too, and the sends you back to the same old message again.

 

OEM Headaches

At first, I think it’s broken. But then I realise it’s because this was an “OEM” edition of Windows 7 – the one that came with the original computer – and they do not transfer from one machine to another.

In fact, they are locked to the motherboard upon installation, so if you want to continue to use it in a new computer from an old computer you’ve purchased pre-built (the ones you buy from a shop) – or from a new OEM DVD installation – you actually can’t. Not if you want to use it in a different machine with a different motherboard. Windows also has specific policies in regards to self-purchased OEM installation discs, as they were created for system-builders only – and the license for it does not cover people who install it inside a purpose-built machine for themselves (like this one).

These editions are actually for “commercial-use” only, and are “non-transferable”… which is why my harvested HDD won’t boot in my new machine.

The only answer is to get a new OS from Microsoft. Unfortunately.

 

The Build:

 

So… it turns out I have a perfectly good system after all. Apart from the fact that Microsoft makes the most ridiculous operating system ever, one that is locked down and unable to be used without giving them a hefty sum of money.

It’s not too hard to see why OS X and Linux systems are the go-to favourites for people who know better. Or those who don’t want to play games (although Linux systems are starting to catch on to this section of computing too).

But Windows is the king of the OS gang, and to play I’m going to have to get it working again – so I’m off to work out where to get a new “retail” edition, and for the best value. Not an easy task whatsoever, given they’re all really far too expensive.

 

My Very Own Self-Build

Putting the whole thing together was not the straightforward experience I hoped it would be – what it was, was a learning curve and one very fun experience. Some of it required quite a bit of problem-solving, and the motherboard instructions were clearly for those in the know. It took a bit of working out and guesswork, but we got there in the end.

Asus_Z97-A_MoboThe motherboard (colloquially known as a “Mobo”) is a beautiful one, but a little more complicated than I expected it to be – and it didn’t help that the instructions were not entirely clear to a building noob like me. It didn’t help that I didn’t realise at first the chassis (case) was (cleverly) built to hide wires inside it and couldn’t work out how certain things hooked up because of this… but I worked it out eventually and fixed it (the moral of our story is read the chassis instructions). The entire chassis is screw-less, except for installing the motherboard, and getting everything from opening the case’s sides to installing the HDD is all cleverly stuck together with clippy sections or thumbscrews.

i7-4790K_CPUThe processor was a much easier component to install, with the thermal paste already pre-applied (thank you, Intel!) and it was easy to place it inside the socket. The heatsink also went on nice and easy – thanks to the screw-less ideation of all hardware-makers, it had little plastic arms (thick and strong ones that are really robust) that clip firmly into place with the aid of a clever twisting mechanism thing. It was so much easier to manage – and far more effective – than the old way of fighting with screws to get it on… it was a joy and a relief to see how the new ones are made! The box was also so much smaller than I imagined it to be – it had just the processor, heatsink, and instruction booklet, and it was barely bigger than the small heatsink. It was small enough to just sit in my hand and the chip was, of course, even tinier, peeping out of a clear window in the lid of the box. The presentation was simple and beautiful, and once out the entire thing was just stupidly easy to install. Well done, Intel!

To keep up with the ease of installation, the graphics card popped into place nicely (having unclipped 2 of the slots in the back) and required no other work whatsoever. There was, however, plenty of room in there for bigger graphics cards, and plenty of extra power supply cables available for any that would require it. The motherboard also fully supports SLI/Crossfire (using more than one graphics card: SLI for NVIDIA & Crossfire for AMD), and the chassis is roomy, so you can at double-up with ease if you care to do so.

Corsair_Veneance_RAMThe RAM cards also went in without any issues. The pair of red Corsair Vengeance Pro cards looks stunning within this gorgeous motherboard and case, and required no more effort other than just popping them in… all 16GB of them. There’s also room for a further two cards for some serious power, and the mobo takes up to 32GB of it.

The PSU also went in easily (just had to press it in a little as the section given is nice and snug) and the cables were already nicely put together in bundled mesh, all sections quite easily identifiable by the codes on the ends of each segment. It’s sturdy, the cables are pretty, and 500W is plenty of juice for what I have right now. Perfect!

The first thing that was fiddly was installing the harvested hard drive… It took a while to work out the HDD needed to be installed upside down, with the pins pointing into the case, not outwards. Thanks to the (overly) effective cable-management design of the Corsair Carbide chassis, it turned out that the power cable attachment and the SATA cable slipped under the HDD section and beneath the disk drives themselves, so once plugged in the HDD would be inserted with the cables going down and inside the case when sliding it into its little pigeon-hole, all nice and tidy.

The second thing that was difficult to install was the SSD (the Samsung 850 EVO, 120 GB).

Since I had never seen this before, it was a bit of a head-scratcher and then a revelation when I realised it. It also makes life so much easier when it comes to the cable management… once you’ve worked out how it works.

 

Future Proof

I really cannot recommend these components highly enough, particularly for fellow “noobs“.

The Corsair chassis is easy to use, has loads of space in it, has a nice lot of fans, is nice and airy, and has plenty of room for installing a cooling system, and has room for 4 hard drives (HDD or SSD types) and 3 optical (DVD) drives. It’s also almost completely screw-less (and, wow, that makes a huge difference!) and has space beneath the motherboard and around the sides for cable management (slipping the cables in, so it’s all nice and tidy in there). Just read all the instructions about it first…

The Asus Z97-A motherboard has just about everything you would need: It is specifically-designed to withstand high-pressure use, such as gaming, and includes overclocking support. It has SLI & Crossfire multi-graphics card support, USB 3.0 and M.2 SATA (a new type of hard drive that looks more like a tiny card rather than a normal HDD) ports, and SATA Express (also known as SATA III/ SATA 3.2) compatible connectors.

It’s not quite the perfect build (after all, it doesn’t have an over-clocked GTX 980 Ti graphics card in it!), but it’s really pretty good and I’m happy with it. It’s future-proof (unless you count being able to upgrade to the new “next gen” Skylake system, which would require an entirely new mobo and processor… and hefty sum of money!). It has everything I require, and is compatible with upgrading to better equipment.

Ideally, I would have behemoth graphics card NVIDIA GTX 980 Ti, but the one I have is a pretty good compromise right now – but the upgrade ability is there. I would also like to install an M.2 or SSD (SATA III) hard drive for the operating system, using the current HDD that I have for storage-only (it’s what is most commonly used these days, particularly with gaming or other high-power functions like professional video editing or music production).

Future-proofing also means having Windows 10 – Microsoft will no longer offer support for any other previous system, and are going to mimic Apple and their OS X system from now on, updating their platform when required with free upgrades and versions for the Windows 10 platform alone. It’s the best model, as Apple has already proven. Is it ironic, coincidence, or deliberate that Microsoft has decided to do this with their 10 system as well..?

I don’t have a cooling system (…yet. I will see how it goes with the fans that it already has). I also do not have a monitor – but then this tiny place that I live in is rather too small for making desk-space, so the display is the TV right now… Which isn’t too bad, given it means I can play my PC games on a big screen too.

 

Reluctantly Windowed

In the end, I caved and bought a copy of Windows 8.1 to finally get it properly up and running. It’s a future-proof investment… but an investment I would not need to make if my old Windows 7 edition wasn’t locked down as an “OEM” copy, though. It would be a simple free upgrade to Windows 10.

Unfortunately, Microsoft do not offer a Windows 10 DVD or ISO (a download for installing onto a DVD or USB yourself) in exchange for the old system key for a Windows edition that came with your old computer, for a genuine OS you can’t get into because they locked it down. No… In that instance they want you to go out any buy a whole new machine, or at least a proper Windows 10 system installation DVD. Naturally.

Despite billions of dollars of profits per year, they still want your money.

Naturally.

The only way to save even a little money was to get a retail copy of Windows 8.1 (which is cheaper now) and take the free upgrade to Windows 10, instead of spending an extra £20+ to get Windows 10 retail upfront.

Thanks to my lovely new Samsung SSD, the installation went lightening-fast, and booting and rebooting are also just as snappy. It was a good investment, and having it on a separate drive also safeguards the system better: If the system becomes corrupted, you can reinstall without having to worry about your data (safely tucked away on the other HDD), and if you have any corrupted data, it won’t harm your system. It’s the most common way (and sensible) way of using system and storage data now, and I would recommend it without a doubt.

I would also highly recommend installing your system onto an SSD (small ones, like my 120GB EVO are not very expensive now), or even an M.2 (if your mobo has that option). The boot times are unimaginable if you’re used to an old HDD – they’re almost instantaneous, and it makes using a PC (or laptop) an entirely different experience.

 

Let There Be Power…

I have to admit (and have it said like a proud mother) that it looks gorgeous and I definitely made the right choices with all the components.

It took several hours and two giant pizzas, but eventually it all came to life. The motherboard fired up, all the fans started spinning, and you could hear the sweet sound of success – a fab fan-humming computer happily working away. The Z97-A even has a little button at the bottom for testing the mobo without having to turn on and boot the entire computer – and flashes little red lights against any areas with a problem, so you don’t have to randomly guess what’s wrong if it’s not working.

The BIOS (“Basic Input/Output System“) of the motherboard launched without any trouble (it’s DEL or F2 for this particular one) and it had some lovely in-built software to make specifically configuring it nice and easy (only required if you’re going to need some extra-specific settings, though).

Everything works just fine… so I can’t really complain. Well, I can. Just a little. Microsoft did make me have to buy a whole new OS for this thing, which was entirely unfair of them.

(Forcing people into getting a new one when they have a perfectly good one already, by locking them down, is a farcical way of obtaining even more money than they already have for no good reason other than corporate greed.)

 

Overview:

This was quite an illuminating journey and a lovely little tech adventure. Now that my baby is up and running, I’m really impressed with everything that I’ve chosen – the quality of the components and they way they play well together is impressive.

I’m most impressed by the difference the SSD has made to how the system runs, and I’m happy I now have my data and games saved and installed on a different drive altogether (also allowing more space to be used more effectively). I have tested it on older games and newer games (Skyrim, Mass Effect 2, Dragon Age: Inquisition, Dragon Age II, The Witcher 2: Assassins of Kings Enhanced Edition, The Elder Scrolls Online, and a few other games). I’m slightly impeded in seeing just how good it can be, since I’m playing them on the TV, which is just a basic 1080 HD screen. With the better monitors running at 2560×1440 (just under Apple’s “Retina” standard of 2880×1800, which I am used to when playing on the MacBook), there are much better graphics and better quality of visuals to be had. That is where a lot of the power goes, and where the graphics card(s), processor, and RAM get to work hard and show off a bit.

Now I’ve done it – successfully – I hope I won’t have to do it again for sometime. Just adding or updating specific components as and when should be absolutely no trouble whatsoever, too. My year of preparation, learning, reading, and researching has paid off, and now I’m more knowledgeable and better equipped to understand how these things work.

I may have wanted to do this a long time ago, but it’s better late than never. And I’m very happy I have now done so.

 

Now peace and gaming at last!

 

Spooky Say Relax!

 

NOTE TO SELF:

The Elder Scrolls Online:

Hide Helmet: Settings > Gameplay> [ITEMS] > Hide Helmet

 

Hide Helmet

Hide Helmet

What's Your Tag?

ps4

Sony’s “Yukimura” update rolls out tomorrow for Playstation 4, adding a plethora of welcome changes. According to Polygon, this update is intended to enhance the social aspects of the top selling console.

The highly requested suspend/resume feature on Xbox One will finally become available to PS4 owners, allowing consumers to easily go to and from their games and pick up where they left off.

Yukimura will focus on social aspects by helping you locate fellow Playstation 4 users on your Facebook friend list, while adding a “Friends Who Play This” feature on each game’s detail page. Xbox One currently offers something similar within their newly added Game Hub, which makes it easier to see who is playing what. For instance, if someone sees that 4 of their friends are really in to Evolve, they may be more inclined to pick it up.

The next Xbox One update has a large focus on Achievement integration, and…

View original post 343 more words

What's Your Tag?

neverwinter2

After a pretty solid beta earlier this year, the upcoming Xbox One MMO Neverwinter is ready for launch next Tuesday on March 31st. Those looking to jump in to the free-to-play RPG can download the 10.5GB file starting today, and be ready to party immediately on launch day!

Following the lore of the Forgotten Realms series, Neverwinter is a fantasy MMO that’s incredibly accessible to newcomers, and offers a pretty well laid out free-to-play model. Without paying a dime, players can create up to two different characters and have access to all expansion content immediately, but there are plenty of upgrade options for in-game currency, new playable races, mounts, vanity pets, fighter companions, additional inventory space, and even more character slots for those of who you like to dabble in a bit of everything.

Will we be seeing you online?

Bio Card Brad

Bradley Keene is the Executive Editor here at What’s Your Tag?

View original post 79 more words

Fedora 21: Package Kit Errors

After experiencing a whole host of issues with Fedora 21 recently, I found the following in the hope that it helps:

http://fedoramagazine.org/special-update-information-for-fedora-21-users-packagekit-errors/

To run:

yum update --advisory=FEDORA-2015-0921

I ran this through, and by the look of the code it seemed to address a number of issues I have recently had trouble addressing in any of the usual ways that I was finding online, not least PackageKit issues.

Further advice states if the problems continues to run:

pkcon repair

Hopefully, this will work….

 

Fedora vs Skype…

 

Skype… Easy to install, right? Just click on the pretty icon on the website and it all appears as if by magic. Right?

Well… Not so much when you’ve got a new Linux distro that is a Fedora edition, it would seem.

Installing Skype on Fedora 21: to say it wasn’t easy would be an understatement. Once I worked out that the best Skype/Microsoft had to offer was a download option for Fedora 16 it seemed like it I had no option: and I was off to see what Professor Google had to say on the matter.

The lovely Prof. Google hit on one of my favourite panic button sites for Fedora problems:

http://www.if-not-true-then-false.com/2012/install-skype-on-fedora-centos-red-hat-rhel-scientific-linux-sl/

This website always seems to have a brilliant answer for all the new Fedora codes for things I need. I love the fact there are so many people out there who not only have the patience and smarts to work these things out, but also put them online to help people.

 

Problems…

One annoying thing was that for some reason there were still issues even after I went though this tutorial… I’m not sure what was wrong, but once I worked out just what the terminal was telling me, it turned out it as missing a whole bunch of added extras too… So one by one I asked the terminal to install them as they appeared.

It was only after running this crapload of code that I finally got Skype up and running — and it actually  works just fine now.

It took much longer to mange than if the package on the website had run properly. Running everything separately, manually, makes things take so long — something we’re not used to in the age of unpacked zip files, and lightning-fast and instant installations at the click of a mouse or tap of the screen. On the other hand there’s a huge sense of achievement when after all that effort, the thing you were trying to get to work actually works.

That is why I like Fedora — everything new I try to do with it gives me some sense of achiement because I did it myself… with the help of dear old Professor a Google, of course.

 

Skype Install

Installing Skype 4.3 on Fedora 21:

http://www.if-not-true-then-false.com/2012/install-skype-on-fedora-centos-red-hat-rhel-scientific-linux-sl/

<Code is written in green>

 

First:

<enter root mode:>

 su -

## OR ##

 sudo -i

 < Changes terminal to:>

[root@localhost ~]# 

 

Installation:

yum localinstall http://dl.fedoraproject.org/pub/epel/7/x86_64/e/epel-release-7-5.noarch.rpm

 

<Success>

 Installed:
  epel-release.noarch 0:7-5
Complete
  • Required Dependencies:
    yum localinstall http://li.nux.ro/download/nux/dextop/el7/x86_64/nux-dextop-release-0-1.el7.nux.noarch.rpm

 

<Success>

 Dependency Updated:
  cups.x86_64 1:1.7.5-15.fc21
  cups-client.x86_64 1:1.7.5-15.fc21
  cups-filesystem.noarch 1:1.7.5-15.fc21
  cups-libs.x86_64 1:1.7.5-15.fc21
  dbus.x86_64 1:1.8.16-1.fc21
  dbus-libs.x86_64 1:1.8.16-1.fc21
  dbus-x11.x86_64 1:1.8.16-1.fc21
  freetype.x86_64 0:2.5.3-15.fc21
  gtk3.x86_64 0:3.14.8-2.fc21
  libgudev1.x86_64 0:216-20.fc21
  libstdc++.x86_64 0:4.9.2-6.fc21
  sqlite.x86_64 0:3.8.8-2.fc21
  systemd.x86_64 0:216-20.fc21
  systemd-compat-libs.x86_64 0:216-20.fc21
  systemd-libs.x86_64 0:216-20.fc21
  systemd-python.x86_64 0:216-20.fc21
  systemd-python3.x86_64 0:216-20.fc21

 

  • Download Skype 4.3 Dynamic
cd /tmp
## Skype 4.3 Dynamic for Fedora/CentOS/RHEL/SL ##
 wget --trust-server-names http://www.skype.com/go/getskype-linux-dynamic

  • Extract Skype:
mkdir /opt/skype
## Extract Skype 4.3 ##
 tar xvf skype-4.3* -C /opt/skype --strip-components=1

 

  • Create Launcher:
ln -s /opt/skype/skype.desktop /usr/share/applications/skype.desktop
 ln -s /opt/skype/icons/SkypeBlue_48x48.png /usr/share/icons/skype.png
 ln -s /opt/skype/icons/SkypeBlue_48x48.png /usr/share/pixmaps/skype.png
touch /usr/bin/skype
 chmod 755 /usr/bin/skype

  • Open /usr/bin/skype with text editor and add following content:
 <Open Text Editor>
 ∘ gedit /usr/bin/skype
 ∘ nano /usr/bin/skype

Then in the text editor add:

#!/bin/sh
 export SKYPE_HOME="/opt/skype"
 $SKYPE_HOME/skype --resources=$SKYPE_HOME $*

<save>

 

<< * INSTALL PROBLEMS * >>

  • PROBLEM: Error Received:
 /opt/skype/skype: error while loading shared libraries: libXv.so.1: cannot open shared object file: No such file or directory

Ran:

 yum install libXv.so.1

<Because the terminal code stated that it was lacking the package named “libXv.so.1”, we request Yum to install it – and keep running the Skype request to find the missing packages until it finally runs>

 

  • PROBLEM: Error Received:
 /opt/skype/skype: error while loading shared libraries: libXss.so.1: cannot open shared object file: No such file or directory

Ran:

yum install libXss.so.1
    • PROBLEM: Error Received:
     /opt/skype/skype: error while loading shared libraries: libQtDBus.so.4: cannot open shared object file: No such file or directory

    Ran:

    yum install libQtDBus.so.4
    • PROBLEM: Error Received:
    /opt/skype/skype: error while loading shared libraries: libQtWebKit.so.4: cannot open shared object file: No such file or directory

    Ran:

    yum install libQtWebKit.so.4

    <<Skype now running >>

     

    run Skype:

    skype