This speaker is really good and better than what I thought it might be (though I have Mpow BT Headphones, and they’re my absolute favourite, so I already had high hopes!).

The sound is clear, volume good — Bass is clear and solid but the EQ is more “Balanced” than “bass heavy”, Vocals were nicely clear and sharp (listening to Goth Rock & Rock-styled “pop” music that rely on good bass & powerful vocals, and it didn’t let the songs down — perfectly good for a shower situation!).

I really enjoyed listening to it, and it was clear to hear in the shower under the spray.

It’s easy to hold (coming from someone who finds holding things difficult) and the back has a soft rubber that makes it non-slippery for the Shower. The buttons on the back are easy to press too, and have solid clicks that let you know you’ve pressed them correctly. 

 It was perfectly fine with the water spray on it. The suction cup that came with it, held its own OK, but when it was under the water spray quite constantly, it did end up falling. And the speaker was none the worse for it, either. I ended up hanging it by the rope under the shower head after that, and the rope is robust and thick and sturdy.

Bluetooth is easy to pair (Looking for “Soundhot Q2” & selecting it, paired with my phone without issue). The in-built TF option (as in Micro SD card, like in your phone) is also a good one, making it even easier to listen to music. 

You can also take hands-free phone calls on this. When I tried this, the tone was clear on both sides, the connection good and stable. It’s answered by an easy click on the Play/Pause/Call button on the back. Just as simple as that.

It seems quite easy to ensure you don’t miss a call whilst you’re in the shower with this. It’s a great idea, because you also can’t miss a call because “you didn’t hear it with the radio on” whilst you were in there, too.


I’m definitely happy with this. It’s proved itself well as a showering companion, and I’ll think nothing of using it as a general BT speaker, either. Mpow in general are definitely a favourite with me in general (and I’ve been through oh-so-many different companies in these things, headphones, speakers, etc!). This didn’t let me down either. Phew!



 

Using Split Screen Safari in iOS 10

… Including how to get back out of it! 

 

Go To 

How To Geek

 

 

And how to get out of it…!

…to go back to a single Safari window is to tap and hold on the tabs button in either Safari window. Select “Merge All Tabs” from the popup menu.

Scrapbook Section

 

TEC.BEAN

7 Colors Backlit Gaming Keyboard

Instruction Book

User Manual

 

   FYI: For me

Backlit  User Settings:

 

 

~      ~      ~ 

 

Mass Effect Andromeda 04.12.2017 - 02.05.56.32

With Mass Effect: Andromeda, it’s a tricky thing to handle when pushing 4K specs on a mid-level graphics card. It’s not a baby, but it’s not racehorse either.

It’s getting to be an older rig now, with the high-end Devil’s Canyon Intel i7-4790K processor, 2x 8GB of RAM, Asus Z97-A board, and now a NVIDIA GTX 1060 6GB OC card (Asus Strix).

I’m dealing with the following specs:

Mass Effect Andromeda
~ PC ~ i7-4790K ~ 16GB RAM ~ GTX 1060 6GB OC ~ 4K graphics resolution~ Recorded at 3840 x 2160 ~ 4K Playback ~

I’ve found this is the best compromise – a middle ground between actually running 4K at a half-decent frame rate, whilst also looking pretty good.

 

Mass Effect Andromeda 05.15.2017 - 23.58.11.01

 

This is only a small part, but it’s the key balancing combination, I’ve found. The rest of the specs are generally Ultra, except for a couple of Highs.

 

 

 

 

NOTES TO SELF:

Mass Effect: Andromeda is fun, exploitative, interesting, and has an immense amount of subtle Easter Eggs nodding to the original ME Trilogy. It even gives you a Space Hamster again – albeit and Andromeda one this time.

What it is not, though, is stable. The NVIDIA graphics have been all over the place, drivers changing constantly for all the gazzilions of games NVIDIA has to give specific support to. It doesn’t seem to restricted to just PC editions either… but I suppose at least  with a PC you have a little more ammunition to work around it than you do with a console.

Because they’re so constantly changing, the rendering has to be modified and tweaked along with, as does my ASUS Stryx overclocking software. Balancing is impossible, because it seems to change with every NVIDIA driver update.

To keep track, I’m just going to leave my notes here, so I can find them again… Hopefully.

 

  ~ Tested with GeForce v. 382.05

 

 

KEY POINTS OF SPECS 1:
  • Medium Lighting
  • Ultra Shadows
  • Medium Post Process
  • High Depthh-of-Field
  • High Shader (Maxed)
  • Ultra Textures
  • Temporal AA
  • HBAO Full
  • Ultra Effects
  • Ultra Terrain

=> Very good colour & graphics; Minor Slowdown in cutscene

 

 

KEY POINTS OF SPECS 2:
  • Low Lighting
  • Ultra Shadows
  • Ultra Post Process
  • High Depth-of-Field
  • High Shader (Maxed)
  • Ultra Textures
  • Temporal AA
  • HBAO Full

=> Good colour & graphics; Some slowdown

 

Mass Effect Andromeda 05.05.2017 - 23.20.24.06

~ Grahics Rendering Specs 2 ~  

 

KEY POINTS OF SPECS 3:
  • Medium Lighting
  • Ultra Shadows
  • Ultra Post Process
  • High Depth-of-Field
  • High Shader (Maxed)
  • Ultra Textures
  • Temporal AA
  • HBAO Full

=> Very good colour & graphics; Slowdown in cutscenes

 

 

KEY POINTS OF SPECS 4:
  • High Lighting
  • Ultra Shadows
  • Medium Post Process
  • High Depth-of-Field
  • High Shader (Maxed)
  • Ultra Textures
  • Temporal AA
  • HBAO Full

=> Good colour & graphics; Slowdown

KEY POINTS OF SPECS 5:
  • Low Lighting
  • Ultra Shadows
  • High Post Process
  • High Depth-of-Field
  • High Shader (Maxed)
  • Ultra Textures
  • Temporal AA
  • HBAO Full

=> Great colour & graphics; Acceptable Cutscenes

 

 

~ 4K Gaming ~

PC SPECS:

~ PC ~ i7-4790K ~ 16GB RAM ~ GTX 1060 6GB OC ~ High/Ultra Specs ~ 4K graphics resolution~ Recorded at 3840 x 2160 ~ 4K Playback ~

 And these are the other Rendering Spec Options:

~ Other Options Tested ~

… Come Back, Mako – All Is Forgiven!

 

Project Overlord

 

Hammerhead(3)

 

Oh, Bioware – there are no words…

I had forgotten just how awful this was. Not the thing in and of itself – but that damned M44-Hammerhead. The flying Mako. Making the Mako look like it’s the best thing ever.  The controls are not terrible… Oh, no. That would be far too generous to call it that.

The hovercraft-tank hybrid thing is an absolute nightmare to control – I would have the Mako any day. This thing appears in two Mass Effect 2 DLCs – Firewalker and Overlord. Whoever designed it should never admit Hammerheadit for fear of being hit by thrown Xbox controllers – as people rage-chuck them about the world from attempting to play this game.

It was actually slightly (about 0.1%) easier to use with an Xbox 360 controller. Having built myself my shiny self-build rig, I got the PC edition of the Mass Effect Trilogy. Then – oh, so stupidly – spent even more money (although not that much, at least) on adding the Overlord DLC. I like the second half of it – and I like saving the character of David. But in the beginning it’s the biggest nightmare of all time in gameplay.

It’s one thing to make it hard. It’s entirely another to make it notoriously frustrating and impossible simply because the control-handing is impossible.

Now I’m trying to play it with Keyboard & Mouse and it’s turning out to be excessively difficult to manage simply because the handling is one of the most ridiculous things I’ve ever tried to handle in a game.

 

Hammerhead_Vulcan.png

 

* NOTE TO SELF: *

  • The key command for “Exit Hammerhead” is not necessarily (F) – it is, in fact, programmed to use whatever was key binding was programmed in Mass Effect to return to the Normandy from the Mako, after exploring a planet.
  • The “Exit Hammerhead” command is the *same*  as the “Leave World” key command in Mass Effect [1]  > 

 

Bindings=( Name="Vehicle_Quit", Command="LeaveWorld" )

 

Exiting_Hammerhead_Code

 

My game is downloaded from EA Origins: The Bindings and other configurations are found in the Coalesced file.

The File is found in:

E:\Games\Mass Effect 2\BioGame\Config\PC\Cooked

~ (on Steam this file-path would be different) ~ 

 

* NOTE TO SELF [2]: *

When “Mining” for resources (the yellow circles, see pic), an important point is to hold down Ctrl whilst “Mining [Right Mouse] (mine is set to RM).

This is mainly for obtaining the Data Hound Achievement in it, as an extra mini-mission. Being able to “Mine” effectively is fairly important – and there’s also a couple of rather tight spots you can mine general mineral  resources from, too.

This stops the Hammerhead from flying off in whatever direction it pleases…

 

 Hammerhead_Mining.png

 

This could have gone a lot better… it’s almost like it’s trying (a little too hard…) to emulate its own themes Trying something new that goes horribly wrong; Pushing tech too far and failing miserably; Thinking it’s a good idea (in theory)… till you actually do it and it fails spectacularly; Emitting outrage from everyone when they’ve found out what you’ve done…

It’s quite a shame that the first half is right out of Satan’s Gaming Handbook – the rest of it is quite entertaining and very interesting… and dark. And creepy. And slightly terrifying at times. It’s not so hard to imagine such things actually happening. It’s not out of the realm of possibilities… unless, of course, it’s happened already… Nothing new under the sun and all that… Scary.

Just like their Hammerhead. Only that’s much, much scarier…

 

 

Skyrim 4K “Level Up” Issue

 

Incidentally, I found a working fix for the notorious and infamous “LEVEL UP” floating text for Skyrim when played in high resolutions and 4K (3840 x 2160).

I found the anwers here and here….

Mine was fixed by changing the Translate_ENGLISH.txt file in:

Steam > steamapps > common > Skyrim > Data > Interface

 

Once opened, scroll down (or run Find) the text file and locate:

$LEVEL UP        LEVEL UP

 

Now replace the second LEVEL UP with either a space ( _ ) [underscore] or with a ( . ) [full-stop], so it looks like this :

 

Skyrim_LevelUp_Fix

Replace the full-stop with the underscore if preferred, but the full stop worked a treat for me

 

Now the “Level Up” text will have vanished and you should have a nice clear screen again. Problem solved and happy exploring!

 

Elder Scrolls V  Skyrim 03.08.2016 - 16.01.01.16

Now there is no circling dragon or floating “Level Up” text on the screeen – Success!

 

 

 

 

 

 

Aside  —  Posted: March 8, 2016 in Gaming, Musings & Rambles, PC
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Well… After scratching my head for some time as to why so suddenly in a new game of Skyrim on PC, I was suddenly being attacked by dragons… many dragons… when all  I’ve done is just left Helgen at the beginning and I’m a measly level 1, and the only dragon I should have met until I reached the Jarl in Whiterun was Alduin at the execution.

For the first time – and I have played this game a lot, particularly the Xbox 360 edition – I’m being attacked by a very irate dragon whilst following the Stormcloak out of the cave and into Riverwood to see his sister. Then I try to escape… Make it all the way to Whiterun… Where there are three – three! – of the bastards (legendary bastards – they even have names!) are not only trying to kill me, but they’re also chasing me as I sprint away back to Riverwood. What the hell did I do to them… I’m not even Dragonborn yet?

Apparently, this would seem to be the result of a mod that was downloaded for the game – I don’t know why it’s on there; I think it was thrown in with the basic Steam download of it (it came with extra mod packets to make it look even more amazing than it already did). I bought the whole package, with the DLCs and everything it had in the Christmas/New Year Steam sale, and it was thrown in with all that somehwere.

Skyrim_Launch_WindowAfter searching for answers, I found suggestions of mod glitches – so I went looking for one. As suggested by some very clever-clogs on one forum, I disengaged the mods (under Data Files in the launch screen) five at a time and relaunched the game afterwards. I repeated this until the dragon circling grumpily over Riverwood (he must have been getting dizzy by now too…) finally vanished.

Then one at a time, I introduced the missing mods back into the game. The culprit that returned the dragon was Skyrim_DragonAttack_Culpritcalled narak.esp – and no, I have no idea what it was, where it came from, or why it’s there. I can’t find a trace of it mentioned via Google either, nor in Steam Community… Unless I’m somehow looking wrong. What I do know is that it made very confused and sent dragons to circle villages and kill me.

So… annoying, it was. This took all night to figure out what it was, then about an hour to go back and forth through it all to find out which one of them, if any, was causing it.

And now that’s finally over with, maybe I can go and work out once and for all how to be rid of the infamous floating “Level Up” glitch for high resolutions. Oh the fun of PC gaming…

 

Elder Scrolls V  Skyrim 03.08.2016 - 13.41.49.07

The annoying, evil Riverwood dragon

 

Elder Scrolls V  Skyrim 03.08.2016 - 13.06.24.02

Now the dragon is gone, I can focus on that annoying “Level Up” text sitting there on the screen…

 

 

My New Build

And finally I have it – my self-build computer all in one piece. I have now built my lovely, new handmade PC from all my components and parts. My own build. My very own baby. With everything chosen by me and put together with the help of a very capably friend (one brought in who knew what they were doing).

I harvested the optical drive (CD/DVD drive) and the HDD (Hard Disk Drive) from my old computer – there’s no point getting rid of good components. The rest I saved for and bought myself, or received as a gift. After about a year of planning, it’s now finally here.

There’s just one hitch… the HDD (a normal hard drive – the ones with the spinning disc plates – that is somewhat old… OK, pretty old… and is just basic cheap and standard-stock) that I put in was harvested from a (now-broken) pre-built computer. I had many problems with booting (or not booting, as the case may be) when trying to run my old machine… and it turns out that the Windows 7 OS on it is doesn’t work.

It tries to start, gives the option for System Repair or start as Normal. The Normal option just sends you strait back to that same message. System Repair then goes through the motions, tries to repair from Restore Point, fails at that too, and the sends you back to the same old message again.

 

OEM Headaches

At first, I think it’s broken. But then I realise it’s because this was an “OEM” edition of Windows 7 – the one that came with the original computer – and they do not transfer from one machine to another.

In fact, they are locked to the motherboard upon installation, so if you want to continue to use it in a new computer from an old computer you’ve purchased pre-built (the ones you buy from a shop) – or from a new OEM DVD installation – you actually can’t. Not if you want to use it in a different machine with a different motherboard. Windows also has specific policies in regards to self-purchased OEM installation discs, as they were created for system-builders only – and the license for it does not cover people who install it inside a purpose-built machine for themselves (like this one).

These editions are actually for “commercial-use” only, and are “non-transferable”… which is why my harvested HDD won’t boot in my new machine.

The only answer is to get a new OS from Microsoft. Unfortunately.

 

The Build:

 

So… it turns out I have a perfectly good system after all. Apart from the fact that Microsoft makes the most ridiculous operating system ever, one that is locked down and unable to be used without giving them a hefty sum of money.

It’s not too hard to see why OS X and Linux systems are the go-to favourites for people who know better. Or those who don’t want to play games (although Linux systems are starting to catch on to this section of computing too).

But Windows is the king of the OS gang, and to play I’m going to have to get it working again – so I’m off to work out where to get a new “retail” edition, and for the best value. Not an easy task whatsoever, given they’re all really far too expensive.

 

My Very Own Self-Build

Putting the whole thing together was not the straightforward experience I hoped it would be – what it was, was a learning curve and one very fun experience. Some of it required quite a bit of problem-solving, and the motherboard instructions were clearly for those in the know. It took a bit of working out and guesswork, but we got there in the end.

Asus_Z97-A_MoboThe motherboard (colloquially known as a “Mobo”) is a beautiful one, but a little more complicated than I expected it to be – and it didn’t help that the instructions were not entirely clear to a building noob like me. It didn’t help that I didn’t realise at first the chassis (case) was (cleverly) built to hide wires inside it and couldn’t work out how certain things hooked up because of this… but I worked it out eventually and fixed it (the moral of our story is read the chassis instructions). The entire chassis is screw-less, except for installing the motherboard, and getting everything from opening the case’s sides to installing the HDD is all cleverly stuck together with clippy sections or thumbscrews.

i7-4790K_CPUThe processor was a much easier component to install, with the thermal paste already pre-applied (thank you, Intel!) and it was easy to place it inside the socket. The heatsink also went on nice and easy – thanks to the screw-less ideation of all hardware-makers, it had little plastic arms (thick and strong ones that are really robust) that clip firmly into place with the aid of a clever twisting mechanism thing. It was so much easier to manage – and far more effective – than the old way of fighting with screws to get it on… it was a joy and a relief to see how the new ones are made! The box was also so much smaller than I imagined it to be – it had just the processor, heatsink, and instruction booklet, and it was barely bigger than the small heatsink. It was small enough to just sit in my hand and the chip was, of course, even tinier, peeping out of a clear window in the lid of the box. The presentation was simple and beautiful, and once out the entire thing was just stupidly easy to install. Well done, Intel!

To keep up with the ease of installation, the graphics card popped into place nicely (having unclipped 2 of the slots in the back) and required no other work whatsoever. There was, however, plenty of room in there for bigger graphics cards, and plenty of extra power supply cables available for any that would require it. The motherboard also fully supports SLI/Crossfire (using more than one graphics card: SLI for NVIDIA & Crossfire for AMD), and the chassis is roomy, so you can at double-up with ease if you care to do so.

Corsair_Veneance_RAMThe RAM cards also went in without any issues. The pair of red Corsair Vengeance Pro cards looks stunning within this gorgeous motherboard and case, and required no more effort other than just popping them in… all 16GB of them. There’s also room for a further two cards for some serious power, and the mobo takes up to 32GB of it.

The PSU also went in easily (just had to press it in a little as the section given is nice and snug) and the cables were already nicely put together in bundled mesh, all sections quite easily identifiable by the codes on the ends of each segment. It’s sturdy, the cables are pretty, and 500W is plenty of juice for what I have right now. Perfect!

The first thing that was fiddly was installing the harvested hard drive… It took a while to work out the HDD needed to be installed upside down, with the pins pointing into the case, not outwards. Thanks to the (overly) effective cable-management design of the Corsair Carbide chassis, it turned out that the power cable attachment and the SATA cable slipped under the HDD section and beneath the disk drives themselves, so once plugged in the HDD would be inserted with the cables going down and inside the case when sliding it into its little pigeon-hole, all nice and tidy.

The second thing that was difficult to install was the SSD (the Samsung 850 EVO, 120 GB).

Since I had never seen this before, it was a bit of a head-scratcher and then a revelation when I realised it. It also makes life so much easier when it comes to the cable management… once you’ve worked out how it works.

 

Future Proof

I really cannot recommend these components highly enough, particularly for fellow “noobs“.

The Corsair chassis is easy to use, has loads of space in it, has a nice lot of fans, is nice and airy, and has plenty of room for installing a cooling system, and has room for 4 hard drives (HDD or SSD types) and 3 optical (DVD) drives. It’s also almost completely screw-less (and, wow, that makes a huge difference!) and has space beneath the motherboard and around the sides for cable management (slipping the cables in, so it’s all nice and tidy in there). Just read all the instructions about it first…

The Asus Z97-A motherboard has just about everything you would need: It is specifically-designed to withstand high-pressure use, such as gaming, and includes overclocking support. It has SLI & Crossfire multi-graphics card support, USB 3.0 and M.2 SATA (a new type of hard drive that looks more like a tiny card rather than a normal HDD) ports, and SATA Express (also known as SATA III/ SATA 3.2) compatible connectors.

It’s not quite the perfect build (after all, it doesn’t have an over-clocked GTX 980 Ti graphics card in it!), but it’s really pretty good and I’m happy with it. It’s future-proof (unless you count being able to upgrade to the new “next gen” Skylake system, which would require an entirely new mobo and processor… and hefty sum of money!). It has everything I require, and is compatible with upgrading to better equipment.

Ideally, I would have behemoth graphics card NVIDIA GTX 980 Ti, but the one I have is a pretty good compromise right now – but the upgrade ability is there. I would also like to install an M.2 or SSD (SATA III) hard drive for the operating system, using the current HDD that I have for storage-only (it’s what is most commonly used these days, particularly with gaming or other high-power functions like professional video editing or music production).

Future-proofing also means having Windows 10 – Microsoft will no longer offer support for any other previous system, and are going to mimic Apple and their OS X system from now on, updating their platform when required with free upgrades and versions for the Windows 10 platform alone. It’s the best model, as Apple has already proven. Is it ironic, coincidence, or deliberate that Microsoft has decided to do this with their 10 system as well..?

I don’t have a cooling system (…yet. I will see how it goes with the fans that it already has). I also do not have a monitor – but then this tiny place that I live in is rather too small for making desk-space, so the display is the TV right now… Which isn’t too bad, given it means I can play my PC games on a big screen too.

 

Reluctantly Windowed

In the end, I caved and bought a copy of Windows 8.1 to finally get it properly up and running. It’s a future-proof investment… but an investment I would not need to make if my old Windows 7 edition wasn’t locked down as an “OEM” copy, though. It would be a simple free upgrade to Windows 10.

Unfortunately, Microsoft do not offer a Windows 10 DVD or ISO (a download for installing onto a DVD or USB yourself) in exchange for the old system key for a Windows edition that came with your old computer, for a genuine OS you can’t get into because they locked it down. No… In that instance they want you to go out any buy a whole new machine, or at least a proper Windows 10 system installation DVD. Naturally.

Despite billions of dollars of profits per year, they still want your money.

Naturally.

The only way to save even a little money was to get a retail copy of Windows 8.1 (which is cheaper now) and take the free upgrade to Windows 10, instead of spending an extra £20+ to get Windows 10 retail upfront.

Thanks to my lovely new Samsung SSD, the installation went lightening-fast, and booting and rebooting are also just as snappy. It was a good investment, and having it on a separate drive also safeguards the system better: If the system becomes corrupted, you can reinstall without having to worry about your data (safely tucked away on the other HDD), and if you have any corrupted data, it won’t harm your system. It’s the most common way (and sensible) way of using system and storage data now, and I would recommend it without a doubt.

I would also highly recommend installing your system onto an SSD (small ones, like my 120GB EVO are not very expensive now), or even an M.2 (if your mobo has that option). The boot times are unimaginable if you’re used to an old HDD – they’re almost instantaneous, and it makes using a PC (or laptop) an entirely different experience.

 

Let There Be Power…

I have to admit (and have it said like a proud mother) that it looks gorgeous and I definitely made the right choices with all the components.

It took several hours and two giant pizzas, but eventually it all came to life. The motherboard fired up, all the fans started spinning, and you could hear the sweet sound of success – a fab fan-humming computer happily working away. The Z97-A even has a little button at the bottom for testing the mobo without having to turn on and boot the entire computer – and flashes little red lights against any areas with a problem, so you don’t have to randomly guess what’s wrong if it’s not working.

The BIOS (“Basic Input/Output System“) of the motherboard launched without any trouble (it’s DEL or F2 for this particular one) and it had some lovely in-built software to make specifically configuring it nice and easy (only required if you’re going to need some extra-specific settings, though).

Everything works just fine… so I can’t really complain. Well, I can. Just a little. Microsoft did make me have to buy a whole new OS for this thing, which was entirely unfair of them.

(Forcing people into getting a new one when they have a perfectly good one already, by locking them down, is a farcical way of obtaining even more money than they already have for no good reason other than corporate greed.)

 

Overview:

This was quite an illuminating journey and a lovely little tech adventure. Now that my baby is up and running, I’m really impressed with everything that I’ve chosen – the quality of the components and they way they play well together is impressive.

I’m most impressed by the difference the SSD has made to how the system runs, and I’m happy I now have my data and games saved and installed on a different drive altogether (also allowing more space to be used more effectively). I have tested it on older games and newer games (Skyrim, Mass Effect 2, Dragon Age: Inquisition, Dragon Age II, The Witcher 2: Assassins of Kings Enhanced Edition, The Elder Scrolls Online, and a few other games). I’m slightly impeded in seeing just how good it can be, since I’m playing them on the TV, which is just a basic 1080 HD screen. With the better monitors running at 2560×1440 (just under Apple’s “Retina” standard of 2880×1800, which I am used to when playing on the MacBook), there are much better graphics and better quality of visuals to be had. That is where a lot of the power goes, and where the graphics card(s), processor, and RAM get to work hard and show off a bit.

Now I’ve done it – successfully – I hope I won’t have to do it again for sometime. Just adding or updating specific components as and when should be absolutely no trouble whatsoever, too. My year of preparation, learning, reading, and researching has paid off, and now I’m more knowledgeable and better equipped to understand how these things work.

I may have wanted to do this a long time ago, but it’s better late than never. And I’m very happy I have now done so.

 

Now peace and gaming at last!

 

Spooky Say Relax!

 

NOTE TO SELF:

The Elder Scrolls Online:

Hide Helmet: Settings > Gameplay> [ITEMS] > Hide Helmet

 

Hide Helmet

Hide Helmet

Aside  —  Posted: June 30, 2015 in Tech
Tags: , , , , , ,